Recent Posts

Have you educated your kids about fire safety?

9/10/2019 (Permalink)

Have you educated your kids about fire safety? Do you know how to talk about fire safety with your kids? 

Here are a few tips:

  • Keep matches and lighters in a secured drawer or cabinet.
  • Have your children tell you when they find matches and lighters.
  • Develop a home fire escape plan. Practice it with your children and designate a meeting place outside, let your neighbors know about this plan so they can help too!
  • Supervise young children closely. Do not leave them alone even for short periods of time.
  • Teach children the nature of fire. It is FAST, HOT, DARK and DEADLY!
  • Demonstrate how to stop, drop, and roll if their clothes catch fire.
  • Show children how to crawl low on the floor, below the smoke, to get out of the house and stay out in the case of fire.
  • Teach children not to hide from firefighters, but to get out quickly and call for help. 
  • Teach children to check the doorknob before opening the door, if it is hot to the touch don't go out there
  • Practice Fire drills at home, so everyone knows how to get out safely. Practicing every year will help your child feel confident in escaping a fire
  • Teach your children on how important it is to have working smoke alarms

How to Prepare for a Hurricane

9/3/2019 (Permalink)

How to Prepare for a Hurricane

Hurricane season is upon us, and being prepared is very important. Listed below is a list to help get you prepared so you can keep yourself and family safe during a Hurricane

  • Listen to the radio to make sure you stay informed on what is going on in your area
  • Check your disaster supplies. Replace or restock as needed.
  • Bring in anything that can be picked up by the wind (bicycles, lawn furniture).
  • Close your windows, doors and hurricane shutters. If you do not have hurricane shutters, close and board up all windows and doors with plywood.
  • Turn your refrigerator and freezer to the coldest setting. Keep them closed as much as possible so that food will last longer if the power goes out.
  • Turn off propane tank.
  • Unplug small appliances.
  • Fill your car’s gas tank.
  • Create a hurricane evacuation plan with members of your household. Planning and practicing your evacuation plan minimizes confusion and fear during the event.
  • Find out about your community’s hurricane response plan. Plan routes to local shelters, register family members with special medical needs and make plans for your pets to be cared for.
  • Obey evacuation orders.
  • Avoid flooded roads and washed out bridges.

If you are a homeowner most homeowner insurance companies don’t cover flooding! Call your insurance company to make sure you are covered!

- Recommended Supplies

Water—at least a 3-day supply; one gallon per person per day

Food—at least a 3-day supply of non-perishable, easy-to-prepare food

Flashlight

Battery-powered or hand-crank radio - NOAA Weather Radio, if possible (Available at the Red Cross Store)

Extra batteries

First aid kit

Medications (7-day supply) and medical items (hearing aids with extra batteries, glasses, contact lenses, syringes, etc.)

Sanitation and personal hygiene items

Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates, insurance policies)

Cell phone with chargers

Family and emergency contact information

Extra cash

Emergency blanket

Baby supplies (bottles, formula, baby food, diapers)

Pet supplies (collar, leash, ID, food, carrier, bowl)

Tools/supplies for securing your home

Extra set of car keys and house keys

Extra clothing, hat and sturdy shoes

Rain gear

If you can build a safe room from the hurricane

National Preparedness Month, What You Can Do!

9/2/2019 (Permalink)

National Preparedness Month, What You Can Do!

Five steps to prepare for a disaster:

  1. Be informed about emergencies that could happen in your community and identify sources of information in your community that will be helpful before, during and after an emergency.
  2. Make a plan for what to do in an emergency. Be sure to practice your plan twice a year and ensure everyone understands their responsibilities and works together as a team.
  3. Build an emergency supply kit. Stock your emergency kit with enough food and water for three to seven days. Include a weather radio, flashlight, batteries and first-aid items. Also place a set of multi-purpose tools, copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates, and insurance policies), cell phone chargers, blankets, and emergency contact information in the kit. Be sure to keep some extra cash on-hand in case ATM machines are not functioning due to damage or loss of power.
  4. Develop a home inventory. Supplement this inventory with photographs or video and store this information in a safe place.
  5. Make sure your smartphone is set to receive Wireless Emergency Alerts. America’s wireless industry is helping to build a Weather-Ready Nation through a nationwide text emergency alert system, called Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA), which will send messages to your phone during and warn you when weather threatens

For more useful information, visit ready.gov.

https://www.accesshomeinsurance.com/its-national-preparedness-month-be-disaster-aware-take-action-to-prepare/

Working Smoke Alarms saves lives

8/26/2019 (Permalink)

Smoke alarms

Smoke alarms save lives. Smoke alarms that are properly installed and maintained play a vital role in reducing fire deaths and injuries. If there is a fire in your home, smoke spreads fast and you need smoke alarms to give you time to get out. 

Here's what you need to know!

  • A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room and outside each separate sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home. 
  • Smoke alarms should be interconnected. When one sounds, they all sound. 
  • Large homes may need extra smoke alarms.
  • Test your smoke alarms at least once a month. Press the test button to be sure the alarm is working.
  • Today’s smoke alarms will be more technologically advanced to respond to a multitude of fire conditions yet mitigate false alarms.
  • When a smoke alarm sounds, get outside and stay outside.
  • Replace all smoke alarms in your home every 10 years.
  • More about installation and maintenance of home smoke alarms.

https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/Staying-safe/Safety-equipment/Smoke-alarms

Fire or Smoke Damage Safety Tips

8/21/2019 (Permalink)

Fire or Smoke Damage Safety Tips

After any fire damage situation, your primary focus should be safety:

  • Is it safe to stay in the house?
  • Electrical and "slip and fall" hazards are some of the most prevalent concerns.
  • Only do activities that are safe for you to perform.
  • Wet materials can be VERY heavy. Be careful!

Have A Fire or Smoke Damage Emergency?  Call 847-469-6982

What to Do After A Fire

  • Limit movement in the home to prevent soot particles from being embedded into upholstery and carpets.
  • Keep hands clean so as not to further soil upholstery, walls and woodwork.
  • Place clean towels or old linens on rugs, upholstery and carpet traffic areas.
  • If electricity is off, empty freezer and refrigerator and prop doors open.
  • Clean and protect chrome with light coating of petroleum jelly or oil.
  • Wash houseplants on both sides of leaves.
  • Change HVAC filter.
  • Tape double layers of cheesecloth over air registers.

What NOT to Do After A Fire

  • Don't attempt to wash any walls or painted surfaces or shampoo carpet or upholstery without contacting your SERVPRO Franchise Professional.
  • Don't attempt to clean any electrical appliances that may have been close to fire, heat or water without consulting an authorized repair service.
  • Don't use any canned or packaged food or beverages that may have been stored near the fire, heat or water.
  • Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet. The wiring may be damaged.
  • Don't send garments to an ordinary dry cleaner. Improper cleaning may set smoke odor.

Jobs that can be Biohazardous

8/6/2019 (Permalink)

Jobs that can be Biohazardous

SERVPRO of Mundelein/North Wauconda professionals are trained to safely and effectively removed bio-hazardous substances and prepare waste for proper disposal according to OSHA, EPA, and state and local health regulations. Equipped with the necessary safety equipment and cleaning products, SERVPRO professionals help turn unsafe environments into clean, safe homes, and offices.

Blood-borne Pathogens

SERVPRO Mundelein/North Wauconda remove and dispose of bodily fluids, tissue, and other potentially pathogenic substances resulting from accident, trauma, crime, or death. Trained SERVPRO technicians thoroughly clean, disinfect, and deodorize the structure.

Methamphetamine Labs

Many of the chemicals used in the production of illegal drugs such as methamphetamine are volatile and can leave harmful residues throughout a structure. SERVPRO of Mundelein/North Wauconda follow federal and state guidelines to properly clean all surfaces.

Crime Scene Residues

From fingerprint powder and evidence-gathering chemicals to tear gas and pepper spray residues, SERVPRO of Mundelein/North Wauconda can clean and restore your property and contents.

Arson and Vandalism

SERVPRO is recognized as leaders at helping property owners recover quickly from fire and water damage. SERVPRO also provides general cleaning and deodorization services for situations resulting from vandalism including graffiti, egg, spoiled foods, and human or animal waste.

Sewage Backup

Sewage backups and black water intrusions are more than nasty, smelly deposits- these damages also introduce harmful microorganisms into a structure. SERVPRO remove the sewage, contaminants and moisture, disinfecting as they clean. SERVPRO help ensure the structure is properly cleaned, disinfected, and deodorized.

Call us today for more information

847-469-6982

Summer Time Safety Tips

7/23/2019 (Permalink)

Summer Time Safety Tips

Summertime is the time for Cooking out, Campfires, and Fireworks. It is also a dangerous time for Fires, and with these helpful tips, it will keep you and your family safe to enjoy the season.

Fireworks Safety

The best way to enjoy fireworks is to visit public fireworks displays put on by professionals who know how to safely handle fireworks.

If you plan to use fireworks, make sure they are legal in your area.

Never light fireworks indoors

Always have a bucket of water and/or a fire extinguisher nearby.

Do not wear loose clothing while using fireworks.

Stand several feet away from lit fireworks. If the firework does not go off, do not stand over it. Put it out with water and dispose of it.

Always read the directions and warning labels on fireworks. If a firework is not marked with the contents, direction and a warning label, do not light it.

Supervise children around fireworks at all times.

Cooking On a Grill Safety (Propane or Charcoal)

Before using a grill, check the connection between the propane tank and the fuel line.

Do not overfill the propane tank.

Do not wear loose clothing while cooking at a barbecue.

Be careful when using lighter fluid. Do not add fluid to an already lit fire because the flame can flashback up into the container and explode.

Keep all matches and lighters away from children. Supervise children around outdoor grills.

Dispose of hot coals properly - use plenty of water to cover the coals, and stir them to ensure that the fire is out. Never place them in plastic, paper or wooden containers.

Never grill/barbecue in enclosed areas - carbon monoxide could be produced.

 Call 911 or your local emergency number if a burn happens and it needs medical attention.

Campfire Safety

Build campfires where they will not spread, away from dry grass and leaves.

Keep campfires small, and don't let them get out of hand.

Keep plenty of water and a shovel around to put on  the fire when you're done. Stir it and douse it again with water, to ensure that the fire is out

Never leave campfires unattended

30/30 Rule

7/16/2019 (Permalink)

We've had lots of severe thunderstorms this season in Lake County area.

SERVPRO of Mundelein/North Wauconda has had an influx of residential and commercial storm cleanup and tree removal request.

Does your family know what to do before, during, and after a lightning storm? Learn the facts and practice your plan.  The 30/30 rule is if there is less than 30 seconds between a flash of lightning and the sound of thunder, seek shelter.  Wait at least 30 minutes after the last clap of thunder before leaving shelter.

Here are some facts about lighting:

  • Lightning’s unpredictability increases the risk to individuals and property.
  • Lightning often strikes outside of heavy rain and may occur as far as 10 miles away from any rainfall.
  • “Heat lightning” is actually lightning from a thunderstorm too far away from thunder to be heard. However, the storm may be moving in your direction.
  • Most lightning deaths and injuries occur when people are caught outdoors in the summer months during the afternoon and evening.
  • Your chances of being struck by lightning are estimated to be 1 in 600,000 but could be reduced even further by following safety precautions.
  • Lightning strike victims carry no electrical charge and should be attended to immediately

There are thousands of deaths a year caused by lighting each year because people are outside at night in the summer months. You should always check the weather when you are going to be outside so you don’t get trapped in a lightning storm.   Technology is the best tool to keep you safe, you can check the weather throughout the evening and night to ensure you will be safe at all times

Be Storm Smart, Be Storm Safe

7/5/2019 (Permalink)

Be Storm Smart, Be Storm Safe

Be Storm Ready, Be Storm Safe!

Severe weather can happen anytime, anywhere. Each year, Americans cope with an average of the following intense storms:

  • 10,000 severe thunderstorms
  • 5,000 floods or flash floods
  • 1,000 tornadoes
  • 2 land falling deadly hurricanes

Approximately 98 percent of all presidentially declared disasters are weather-related, leading to

around 500 deaths per year and nearly $15 billion in damage. Knowing your risk of severe weather, taking action and being an example are just a few steps you can take to be better prepared to save your life and assist in saving the lives of others.

Know Your Risk

The first step to becoming weather-ready is to understand the type of

hazardous weather that can affect where you live and work, and how the weather could

impact you, your business and your family. Check the weather forecast regularly, obtain a

NOAA Weather Radio, and learn about Wireless Emergency Alerts. Severe weather comes in many forms and your shelter plan should include all types of local hazards.

Take Action

Take the next step in severe weather preparedness by creating a communications plan for your home and business. Put together or purchase an emergency kit. Keep important papers and valuables in a safe place.

Be an Example

Once you have taken action to prepare for severe weather, share your story with

co-workers and family and friends on Facebook or Twitter. Your preparedness story will inspire

others to do the same.

If Storm Damage occurs, call SERVPRO of Mundelein/North Wauconda 847-469-6982

Restore vs Replace

6/25/2019 (Permalink)

At SERVPRO we are in the business of restoration rather than replacement - this provides the benefits of not only lower costs but also a smaller ecological footprint. On a more personal level, restoration vs. replacement provides home owners peace of mind, in the event of a loss, that they will be able to make the most of any insurance payments they receive.

Why do we focus on restoration?

  • We minimize the amount of building material discarded into landfills.
  • We preserve the original architecture of building structures.
  • Restoration is much more cost-efficient than replacement.
  • Many items cannot be replaced, such as important documents and family heirlooms.

In addition to preserving original structures and items, a drive towards restoration can better satisfy a complete return to normalcy when catastrophe occurs. Insurance policies often have limits that cap the amount of a claim - restoration allows for minimizing the costs of returning a structure to its preloss condition.

SERVPRO works seamlessly with insurance companies nationwide, providing them with restoration budgets that not only meet their stringent guidelines, but provide the homeowner with the best possible outcome.

You have a choice when it comes to who to trust with your home after a fire or flood. Choose SERVPRO of Mundelein/North Wauconda and let us help you make it… “Like it never even happened.”

We can be reached 847-469-6982