Recent Posts

Working Smoke Alarms saves lives

10/21/2020 (Permalink)

Working Smoke Alarms save lives

Smoke alarms

Smoke alarms save lives. Smoke alarms that are properly installed and maintained play a vital role in reducing fire deaths and injuries. If there is a fire in your home, smoke spreads fast and you need smoke alarms to give you time to get out. 

Here's what you need to know!

  • A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat and fire. Install smoke alarms in every sleeping room and outside each separate sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home. 
  • Smoke alarms should be interconnected. When one sounds, they all sound. 
  • Large homes may need extra smoke alarms.
  • Test your smoke alarms at least once a month. Press the test button to be sure the alarm is working.
  • Today’s smoke alarms will be more technologically advanced to respond to a multitude of fire conditions yet mitigate false alarms.
  • When a smoke alarm sounds, get outside and stay outside.
  • Replace all smoke alarms in your home every 10 years.
  • More about installation and maintenance of home smoke alarms.

https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/Staying-safe/Safety-equipment/Smoke-alarms

Power Outages

10/15/2020 (Permalink)

Power Outages

Extended power outages may impact the whole community and the economy. A power outage is when the electrical power goes out unexpectedly. A power outage may:

  • Disrupt communications, water, and transportation.
  • Close retail businesses, grocery stores, gas stations, ATMs, banks, and other services.
  • Cause food spoilage and water contamination.
  • Prevent use of medical devices.

PROTECT YOURSELF DURING A POWER OUTAGE:

  • Keep freezers and refrigerators closed.
  • Only use generators outdoors and away from windows.
  • Do not use a gas stove to heat your home.
  • Disconnect appliances and electronics to avoid damage from electrical surges.
  • Have alternate plans for refrigerating medicines or using power-dependent medical devices.
  • If safe, go to an alternate location for heat or cooling.
  • Check on neighbors.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A POWER OUTAGE THREATENS: 

Prepare NOW

  • Take an inventory of the items you need that rely on electricity.
  • Talk to your medical provider about a power outage plan for medical devices powered by electricity and refrigerated medicines. Find out how long medication can be stored at higher temperatures and get specific guidance for any medications that are critical for life.
  • Plan for batteries and other alternatives to meet your needs when the power goes out.
  • Sign up for local alerts and warning systems. Monitor weather reports.
  • Install carbon monoxide detectors with battery backup in central locations on every level of your home.
  • Determine whether your home phone will work in a power outage and how long battery backup will last.
  • Review the supplies that are available in case of a power outage. Have flashlights with extra batteries for every household member. Have enough nonperishable food and water.
  • Use a thermometer in the refrigerator and freezer so that you can know the temperature when the power is restored. Throw out food if the temperature is 40 degrees or higher.
  • Keep mobile phones and other electric equipment charged and gas tanks full.

Survive DURING

  • Keep freezers and refrigerators closed. The refrigerator will keep food cold for about four hours. A full freezer will keep the temperature for about 48 hours. Use coolers with ice if necessary. Monitor temperatures with a thermometer.
  • Maintain food supplies that do not require refrigeration.
  • Avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Generators, camp stoves, or charcoal grills should always be used outdoors and at least 20 feet away from windows. Never use a gas stovetop or oven to heat your home.
  • Check on your neighbors. Older adults and young children are especially vulnerable to extreme temperatures.
  • Go to a community location with power if heat or cold is extreme.
  • Turn off or disconnect appliances, equipment, or electronics. Power may return with momentary “surges” or “spikes” that can cause damage.

Be Safe AFTER

  • When in doubt, throw it out! Throw away any food that has been exposed to temperatures 40 degrees or higher for two hours or more, or that has an unusual odor, color, or texture.
  • If the power is out for more than a day, discard any medication that should be refrigerated, unless the drug’s label says otherwise. If a life depends on the refrigerated drugs, consult a doctor or pharmacist and use medicine only until a new supply is available.

Source: https://www.ready.gov/power-outages

Have you educated your kids about fire safety?

9/14/2020 (Permalink)

Have you educated your kids about fire safety?

Have you educated your kids about fire safety? Do you know how to talk about fire safety with your kids? 

Here are a few tips:

  • Keep matches and lighters in a secured drawer or cabinet.
  • Have your children tell you when they find matches and lighters.
  • Develop a home fire escape plan. Practice it with your children and designate a meeting place outside, let your neighbors know about this plan so they can help too!
  • Supervise young children closely. Do not leave them alone even for short periods of time.
  • Teach children the nature of fire. It is FAST, HOT, DARK and DEADLY!
  • Demonstrate how to stop, drop, and roll if their clothes catch fire.
  • Show children how to crawl low on the floor, below the smoke, to get out of the house and stay out in the case of fire.
  • Teach children not to hide from firefighters, but to get out quickly and call for help. 
  • Teach children to check the doorknob before opening the door, if it is hot to the touch don't go out there
  • Practice Fire drills at home, so everyone knows how to get out safely. Practicing every year will help your child feel confident in escaping a fire
  • Teach your children on how important it is to have working smoke alarms

National Preparedness Month, What You Can Do!

9/9/2020 (Permalink)

National Preparedness Month, What You Can Do!

National Preparedness Month, What You Can Do!

Five steps to prepare for a disaster:

  1. Be informed about emergencies that could happen in your community and identify sources of information in your community that will be helpful before, during and after an emergency.
  2. Make a plan for what to do in an emergency. Be sure to practice your plan twice a year and ensure everyone understands their responsibilities and works together as a team.
  3. Build an emergency supply kit. Stock your emergency kit with enough food and water for three to seven days. Include a weather radio, flashlight, batteries and first-aid items. Also place a set of multi-purpose tools, copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates, and insurance policies), cell phone chargers, blankets, and emergency contact information in the kit. Be sure to keep some extra cash on-hand in case ATM machines are not functioning due to damage or loss of power.
  4. Develop a home inventory. Supplement this inventory with photographs or video and store this information in a safe place.
  5. Make sure your smartphone is set to receive Wireless Emergency Alerts. America’s wireless industry is helping to build a Weather-Ready Nation through a nationwide text emergency alert system, called Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA), which will send messages to your phone during and warn you when weather threatens

For more useful information, visit ready.gov.

https://www.accesshomeinsurance.com/its-national-preparedness-month-be-disaster-aware-take-action-to-prepare/

Fire or Smoke Damage Safety Tips

8/20/2020 (Permalink)

Fire or Smoke Damage Safety Tips

After any fire damage situation, your primary focus should be safety:

  • Is it safe to stay in the house?
  • Electrical and "slip and fall" hazards are some of the most prevalent concerns.
  • Only do activities that are safe for you to perform.
  • Wet materials can be VERY heavy. Be careful!

Have A Fire or Smoke Damage Emergency?  Call 847-469-6982

What to Do After A Fire

  • Limit movement in the home to prevent soot particles from being embedded into upholstery and carpets.
  • Keep hands clean so as not to further soil upholstery, walls and woodwork.
  • Place clean towels or old linens on rugs, upholstery and carpet traffic areas.
  • If electricity is off, empty freezer and refrigerator and prop doors open.
  • Clean and protect chrome with light coating of petroleum jelly or oil.
  • Wash houseplants on both sides of leaves.
  • Change HVAC filter.
  • Tape double layers of cheesecloth over air registers.

What NOT to Do After A Fire

  • Don't attempt to wash any walls or painted surfaces or shampoo carpet or upholstery without contacting your SERVPRO Franchise Professional.
  • Don't attempt to clean any electrical appliances that may have been close to fire, heat or water without consulting an authorized repair service.
  • Don't use any canned or packaged food or beverages that may have been stored near the fire, heat or water.
  • Don't turn on ceiling fixtures if ceiling is wet. The wiring may be damaged.
  • Don't send garments to an ordinary dry cleaner. Improper cleaning may set smoke odor.

Basic Spot Removal Procedures

8/13/2020 (Permalink)

Basic Spot Removal Procedures

  1. Attend to spills as soon as possible. Older stains are harder to remove. Scrape or blot up excess reside of spot. Always blot; never rub carpet or upholstery fabric. Rubbing may cause irreparable fiber distortion.
  2. We always pretest spot removing solutions in an inconspicuous area before applying to spot to ensure the performance of our procedure and safety of your fabric. We inspect closely for dye transfer or changes in the fabric’s appearance.
  3. When attempting to remove a spot, remember, like dissolves like. A water-based stain will dissolve in water-based solution (sometimes water just works!). Oil-based spills need to be dissolved using a solvent solution. SERVPRO makes sure the correct procedures are used.
  4. After removing the spot, we rinse the area blot with an absorbent cloth or towel.

We cannot guarantee complete spot removal, but we will do our professional best.

Call us Today- 847-469-6982!

Be Storm Smart, Be Storm Safe

8/6/2020 (Permalink)

Be Storm Smart, Be Storm Safe

Be Storm Ready, Be Storm Safe!

Severe weather can happen anytime, anywhere. Each year, Americans cope with an average of the following intense storms:

  • 10,000 severe thunderstorms
  • 5,000 floods or flash floods
  • 1,000 tornadoes
  • 2 land falling deadly hurricanes

Approximately 98 percent of all presidentially declared disasters are weather-related, leading to around 500 deaths per year and nearly $15 billion in damage. Knowing your risk of severe weather, taking action and being an example are just a few steps you can take to be better prepared to save your life and assist in saving the lives of others.

Know Your Risk

The first step to becoming weather-ready is to understand the type of hazardous weather that can affect where you live and work, and how the weather could impact you, your business and your family. Check the weather forecast regularly, obtain a NOAA Weather Radio, and learn about Wireless Emergency Alerts. Severe weather comes in many forms and your shelter plan should include all types of local hazards.

Take Action

Take the next step in severe weather preparedness by creating a communications plan for your home and business. Put together or purchase an emergency kit. Keep important papers and valuables in a safe place.

Be an Example

Once you have taken action to prepare for severe weather, share your story with co-workers and family and friends on Facebook or Twitter. Your preparedness story will inspire others to do the same.

If Storm Damage occurs, call SERVPRO of Mundelein/North Wauconda 847-469-6982

Grilling Safety Do's and Don'ts

8/3/2020 (Permalink)

Grilling Safety Do's and Don'ts

Grill Safety

May is National BBQ Month, with everyone grilling this time of year it is important to remember that grilling can be very dangerous. Below are some do’s and don’ts to keep friends, family, children, and yourself safe!

The Do’s and Don’ts of grill safety:

Do:

  • Keep your grill at least ten feet away from your house.
  • Make sure to keep your grill clean.
  • Always check for gas leaks.
  • Make sure to keep decorations or anything that may be flammable up away from your grill.
  • Always keep a fire hydrant nearby.
  • Keep baking soda near, in case of a grease fire
  • Make sure your grill is on a flat surface
  • If the flame goes out, remember to wait a few minutes before re-lighting

Don’ts:

  • Never turn your gas on when the lid is shut.
  • Do not leave your grill unattended.
  • Never use your grill inside your home.
  • Don’t let children play around the grill
  • Don't over fill your grill with food-grease could build up and cause a fire

Water You Don't See!

7/28/2020 (Permalink)

Water You Don't See!

It may not look like much water, but the cleanup could be way over your head!

A mop and common household cleaning products may not be enough for black water intrusions. Your local SERVPRO franchise professional is trained to safely clean and restore your customer's home, utilizing the following procedures:

  • Identify the source/type of water
  • Measure temperature and humidity for drying analysis
  • Survey the extent of damage and inspect the premises
  • Perform emergency water extraction
  • Move and block furniture
  • Provide floor service
  • Inspect carpet pad/carpet and provide necessary service
  • Apply necessary treatments such as deodorization
  • Utilize drying equipment and monitor drying
  • Dispose of refuse

Each SERVPRO franchise professional is trained and understands how to manage the drying process. By utilizing the proper equipment and moisture measuring devices, a structure is quickly and thoroughly dried, which helps prevent secondary water damages such as microbial growth and development.

No matter the size or type of damage, SERVPRO employees are constantly working together as a team to make water damages like they never even happened.

Emergency Ready Profile

7/21/2020 (Permalink)

Emergency Ready Profile

When disaster strikes, every minute counts. Here at SERVPRO® of Mundelein/North Wauconda, we help local businesses prepare in advance for building disasters. By creating an Emergency Ready Profile, you minimize interruptions in the daily operations of your business by having an immediate plan of action in place should disaster strike. The Emergency Ready Profile provides immediate contact information and other important details that provide a guide to get your business back up and running after a disaster. Knowing what to do and what to expect in advance is the key to timely mitigation and can help minimize how water and fire damage can affect your business. Be ready and get a free Emergency Ready Profile with SERVPRO of Mundelein/North Wauconda.

Emergency Ready Profile

An ERP contains the following:

Action Plan – What to do in what order to ensure the safety of occupants and minimize structural damage.

Contact Info – Phone numbers for emergency services, building maintenance, and key contractors.

Utility Shutoffs – Photos and descriptions of the locations of water, electric, and heating fuel shutoffs. If a key is needed for access, we note who holds the key.

Building Specific Info – An ERP can be customized to add any information specific to your building or industry that helps with your disaster response.

To find out more give us a call! 847-469-6982